How the public can pay respects to King Bhumibol

The Bureau of the Royal Household has announced that during the 100-day Royal Funeral Rites, the general public are allowed to pay respect and write messages of condolence to His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej at the Grand Palace as follows:

• Every day 08.30-16.00 Hrs.: Sala Sahathai Samakom Pavilion.
Pay respect to His Majesty the King’s royal remains at Dusit Maha Prasat Hall.
• 29 October 2016, 13.00-16.00 Hrs. (changed from 28 October)

To facilitate members of the public to travel to pay their respect to His Majesty King Bhumibol Adulyadej, the Ministry of Tourism and Sports in collaboration with the public and private tourism sector is providing transportation and preparing special arrangements, starting from 17 October, 2016, as follows:

1. For members of the public wishing to travel to the Sala Sahathai Samakhom Pavilion at the Grand Palace, in the Sanam Luang area, the Thai Transportation Operators Association, the Tourism Authority of Thailand (TAT) and the Royal Thai Police are providing free bus services from 17-24 October, 2016, 08:30 – 15.00 Hrs. The hourly bus services cover four routes, starting from the National Stadium, Victory Monument, Wongwian Yai BTS Station, and the Bangkok Bus Terminal in Talingchan, to Sanam Luang.

2. For members of the public in the Ramkhamhaeng area and within the vicinity of the Sports Authority of Thailand who are unable to visit the Sanam Luang area, they will be able to pay their respect and write messages of condolence in front of the late monarch’s portrait at the Sports Authority of Thailand’s Commemorating His Majesty’s 7th Cycle Birthday Anniversary Building. In addition, the national broadcast of the 100-day prayers during the Royal Funeral Rites will be made available on two large LED screens in front of the Building. These broadcasts will begin on Monday, 17 October, from 09.00 Hrs. onwards.

3. For members of the public in the city centre, including Siam Square, MBK Complex and within the vicinity of the National Stadium who are unable to visit the Sanam Luang area, the Department of Physical Education, Ministry of Tourism and Sports has prepared a book of condolences for the general public to pay their respect and write messages of condolence in front of the late monarch’s portrait at the National Stadium. In addition, the national broadcast of the 100-day prayers during the Royal Funeral Rites will be made available at the Nimibutr Building. Members of the public are advised to travel to the National Stadium by the BTS Skytrain, getting off at the National Stadium Station.

In addition, the number of trains coming to Bangkok has been increased to 150 from 132. The State Railway of Thailand began adding extra carriages and extra trains for free to Bangkok from Friday, 14 October, 2016, onwards. An additional 64 carriages a day are now available on trains operating between Bangkok and the surrounding provinces. For more information, please contact the State Railway of Thailand Call Centre at 1690.

During the period of national mourning, TAT would like to advise that some festivals and activities in the kingdom may be cancelled or postponed. Other events will go ahead as planned, but may be toned down as a mark of respect. We would like to recommend that any visitors with travel or tourism plans reconfirm with agents and check local media regularly as well as follow the advice of the local authorities for announcements and updates. Also, please check directly with the respective organisers on the status of events.

For further updates, please click here.

Useful Links:
The Bureau of the Royal Household – in Thai
The Royal Thai Government – in English
The Government Public Relations Department – In English
The Ministry of Foreign Affairs – In English
TAT Contact Center

Source: Press Release from TAT

17 thoughts on “How the public can pay respects to King Bhumibol

  • October 21, 2016 at 1:27 am
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    Thank you keep posting about our King.
    You ‘d make me closer to home , I’m very do appreciate what you do.
    Thank you
    Noi
    California

    Reply
  • October 31, 2016 at 7:37 pm
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    Can I know when will the 100 days for paying respect at the Grand Palace ends and do I need to buy the entrance ticket to the Grand Palace ?

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    • October 31, 2016 at 7:51 pm
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      They haven’t announced when it will stop but I’m presuming on 21 January. You don’t buy tickets to pay respect to King Bhumibol’s body. Just queue up. But the queues are massive at the moment and so best to wait.

      Reply
  • November 20, 2016 at 4:38 am
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    I will be returning to Bangkok in December and would like to pay my respects to the late King. Is it appropriate for farang to join with Thai visitors and is there any specific clothing protocol?

    Reply
  • December 14, 2016 at 9:18 pm
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    I read that there was going to be an online booking system for those wishing to pay their respects at the Royal Palace.
    I can’t find the online system.
    Does it exist?
    If yes where?
    Thanks
    John

    Reply
  • January 22, 2017 at 4:43 pm
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    You recommend wearing black when paying respect to the late king.
    What is in your eyes a must for a farang man?
    – black long trousers?
    – black shirt short or long sleeves?
    – black shoes?
    – black tie?

    Reply
    • January 24, 2017 at 6:47 am
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      We are already beyond the 100 day mourning period. Anyway, it was never compulsory for foreign tourists to wear mourning clothes. Though in the early days some wore a black ribbon as a way to show respect.

      Reply
  • April 23, 2017 at 9:01 pm
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    Hi..I know it’s passed 100 days and I’ll be in Thailand this May, will I still be able to pay my respect at the royal palace?

    Reply
        • August 31, 2017 at 10:15 am
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          Just went yesterday to pay my respects, 30 August. I went around 9:30am, waited 3 hours in lines under tents with seats and lots of free drinking water, and given a free meal with dessert at the end. One should wear black, long sleeved shirts with long black skirts and trousers whether local or not. Not wearing proper clothes shows you are not there to mourn. Ties are not necessary but shoes are, which are removed and put in a plastic bag handed out. Only school kids in uniforms allowed. No photos inside the palace and where the royal urn is. Cellphones must be put on silent mode. You get about 10 seconds to pay your respects. Very orderly system and they do take care of you. If you go at night there is less waiting time but the last group is allowed in at 8pm.

          Reply
          • August 31, 2017 at 10:21 am
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            Also, do not go on a weekend as the lines and waiting times will be much longer. I don’t know when this will end, but I heard 30 days before the cremation on 26 October. By the way, the best way to get there is to go to the Royal Rattanakosin Hotel, as the entrance is right across the street where all the tents begin. Taking the river ferry to the Grand Palace means a long walk. There is no entrance fee, of course, but it is worth waiting for.

  • May 8, 2017 at 2:27 am
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    Hello, I would like to pay respect to the late king but I have child who is 9 years old. Can you tell me when the best time to go is to avoid a very long line? I plan on attending on a Tuesday in June, do you know what the current wait times are?

    Reply
  • September 25, 2017 at 6:36 pm
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    Hi, I know this the last week to pay respect to the late King could anybody update the timings we can pay respect. It will be highly appreciated as I am planning to go this week.
    Thank you

    Reply

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