Full Road Accident Statistics for New Year 2013-2014 in Thailand

December 28, 2013
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We have now reached that time of year when the Thai government publicise the daily accident reports from around Thailand. This year, the “Seven Dangerous Days of the New Year” is from 27th December 2013 to Thursday 2nd January 2014. From past experience with this, I have found the statistics not to be accurate. Partly due to they usually only count deaths on scene, but also because some accidents go unreported. But, it does give some indication of how bad it is on the roads.

7 Dangerous Days on Thailand’s Roads:
Day 1: 39 deaths (33 in 2012)
Day 2: 47 deaths (38)
Day 3: 75 deaths (77)
Day 4: 48 deaths (54)
Day 5: 57 deaths (52)

Friday 27th December 2013: On the first day, 39 people were killed and 399 injured in 392 road accidents. Causes of most accidents were drink driving and speeding. Most accidents involved motorcycles (81.82%) and pick-up trucks (7.37%). The most dangerous provinces for accidents were Phitsanulok and Samut Sakhon. Provinces with the highest number of deaths were Pathum Thani, Prachinburi and Surat Thani.

Saturday 28th December 2013: On the second day, 47 people were killed and 486 injured in 474 accidents. Causes of most accidents were drunk driving (37.13%) and speeding (23%). Most accidents involved motorcycles (81.52%). The most dangerous province for accidents was Nakorn Sri Thammarat. Province with the highest number of deaths was Phra Nakorn Sri Ayuthaya.

Sunday 29th December 2013: On the third day, 75 people were killed and 503 injured in 456 accidents. Causes of most accidents were drunk driving (39.47%) and speeding (30.26%). Most accidents involved motorcycles (78.48%). The most dangerous province for accidents was Nakorn Ratchasima. Province with the highest number of deaths was Nakorn Ratchasima.

Monday 30th December 2013: On the fourth day, 48 people were killed and 541 injured in 496 accidents. Causes of most accidents were drunk driving (44.76%) and speeding (23.39%). Most accidents involved motorcycles (79.65%). The most dangerous province for accidents was Chaing Rai. Provinces with the highest number of deaths were Chiang Mai and Udon Thani.

Tuesday 31st December 2013: On the fifth day, 57 people were killed and 571 injured in 537 accidents. Causes of most accidents were drunk driving (47.86%) and speeding (28.49%). Most accidents involved motorcycles (83.99%). The most dangerous province for accidents was Chaing Mai. Provinces with the highest number of deaths were Buriram and Suphanburi.

Most accidents happen on straight roads. The period which most accidents occurred is during 4:01pm – 8pm. Most of the road accident victims are working age. (58.94%).

Road Deaths for New Year 2012-2013: Day 1 (33), Day 2 (38), Day 3 (77), Day 4 (54), Day 5 (52), Day 6 (78), Day 7 (34)

New Year 2010: 347 deaths, 3,827 injuries and 3,534 accidents
New Year 2011: 358 deaths, 3,750 injuries and 3,497 accidents
New Year 2012: 336 deaths, 3,375 injuries and 3,093 accidents
New Year 2013: 365 deaths, 3,329 injuries and 3,176 accidents

2 Responses to Full Road Accident Statistics for New Year 2013-2014 in Thailand

  1. David
    December 29, 2013 at 3:47 am

    Driving in Thailand is very dangers and I am glad that I don’t have a drivers permit. A driving permit in Thailand isn’t investment it’s a de-investment just borrowing on trouble because the ” Thai roads of the roads ” people do not obey nor does the police implement the law correctly with out their hands out for a bribe.

  2. Robert
    December 30, 2013 at 3:24 am

    I do drive in Thailand and so far (knock on wood) it has always been a rather pleasant experience. I follow a few simple rules: No driving during peak hours in Bangkok on roads I am not familiar with. Driving defensively, more so than I would in my own country (Netherlands). On Thailands great highways I only drive during daylight hours.
    It is true though that every day again you will be surprised what people do on the roads in Thailand, and there is no single moment you can let your attention slip away.

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